Beautiful maps and infographics of the election campaign

This election campaign has created its fair share of animated beauty. We explore some of the best.

 

ELECTION FORECAST

One of the most colourful and stark of all the maps is produced by electionforecast.co.uk . This demonstrates what is likely to happen if the current polls are replicated on May 7th.  Vast swathes of Scotland are due to turn Yellow as the SNP wipe the board, leaving only a few Labour seats north of the border.

 

BUT WHERE ARE THE VOTES?

The above map also makes it look like there are very few Labour seats in comparison to Conservative ones.  This is due to the fact that most Labour seats are tiny urban ones with high population density, whereas Tory ones tend to be large and rural with fewer people per square mile.  The below map from the Guardian shows how the map changes when each seat is made equal in size.  Labour look a lot more popular.

 

SO WHY IS THIS ELECTION ANY DIFFERENT FROM OTHER ONES?

Mainly because so many people are changing who they vote for, particularly away from the Lib Dems and notably to the Scottish National Party, UKIP and the Greens.  The beautiful infographic below from May2015.com shows who people voted for in 2010 versus who they support now.

 

 

SO THIS IS A TOUGH ELECTION TO CALL, RIGHT?

You bet.  The BBC's poll tracker shows the Conservatives neck and neck, on 34% and 33%, as below.

 

BUT DOESN'T THAT MEAN THE TORIES WILL WIN?

Not necessarily.  The electoral system has an in-built bias against the Tories and towards Labour.  This meant that in 2005 Labour won by 3% and got 157 seats more than the Conservatives, but in 2010 the Conservatives won by 7% and failed to get a majority at all.  That's why the forecast of probabilities, shown in the below graphic from elections etc, still puts Ed Miliband ahead to be Prime Minister, albeit at the head of a coalition of minority government.

 

YEAH, I HEAR A FEW OF THE PARTIES GET ON A LOT BETTER THAN OTHERS...

You're not wrong, and as luck would have it the Independent have produced this lovely infographic showing whose policy priorities overlap with other parties.

 

ELECTION CAMPAIGN ON SOCIAL MEDIA

There has been a real take-off in the use of social media during the campaign, with many hoping it will help get the youth vote out.  But how does the online debate compare to the real one?  Well, News By Design have helpfully compiled this beauty to give you a snapshot of how the election is running through Twitter et al.

HOW CAN I FIND OUT WHAT'S HAPPENING IN MY LOCAL AREA?

The lovely people over at Democratic Dashboard have created an infographic of each constituency, telling you what is likely to happen on May 7th in your area, how much the parties are spending there and what chance your vote has of changing the local MP.  This one shows Paisley and Renfrewshire South where Labour MP Douglas Alexander looks like he may lose his seat, the poor lamb.

YEAH YEAH, ELECTION ELECTION, BLAH BLAH BLAH, TELL ME ABOUT MY FOOTBALL TEAM!

Ok!  Turns out, according to May2015.com, the better your football team, the more likely it is to be in a Labour seat.  Someone says it's because most football teams grew up in industrial heartlands, which have retained their penchant for voting Labour.  Don't trust us, look at this graph below that proves it!

Julian

Hill & Knowlton Strategies Search